From our Permanent Collection: Dean Cornwell’s “Romance at One”

Dean Cornwell (1892 - 1960) was a very prolific painter who dominated the illustration industry throughout his career.  His oil paintings were featured in notable publications like Cosmopolitan, Harper’s Bazaar, Redbook, and Good Housekeeping, and he painted murals for the Los Angeles Public Library, the Warwick New York Hotel, the U.S. Post Office in Chapel Hill, among others.

He was greatly influenced by his teacher Harvey Dunn and the British muralist Frank Brangwyn, and went on to teach at the Art Students League in New York.  

He was the president of the Society of Illustrators from 1922-1926, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1959.

Below is his piece titled “Romance at One”, illustration for the story by Thyra Samter Winslow.  The caption reads: “‘I hope they don’t like me,’Molly said. ‘Whatever would he think- my coming to a place like this.’” For Pictorial Review, October 1938. This piece is an oil on illustration board mounted on masonite.

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And below is the work in print (notice the additional couple):

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The background of this illustration shows a mural by Cornwell from The Raleigh Room, commissioned by William Randolph Hearst for the restaurant inside his Warwick New York hotel.  The mural was completed in 1938 and “depicts Sir Walter Raleigh receiving his charter from Queen Elizabeth I in 1584 and Raleigh landing at Roanoke Island” (taken from Murals on 54).

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Past president and Co-Chair of the Permanent Collection, Richard Berenson, notes “At the time of Cornwell’s death in 1960, many of his illustrations were destroyed, reportedly by his grief-stricken widow (who also was peeved at his frequent philandering). The story about this particular piece is that she broke it into pieces small enough to fit into the coal-fired furnace but stopped before it went up in flames. When the Society, where Cornwell had been president in the mid-1920s, acquired the art in 1980, it was still in pieces; restoring it was a monumental task. It currently is installed in the Executive Director’s office but will eventially be fitted out with museum glass so that it can hang in public spaces at the Museum.”

The Art of Leo and Diane Dillon: On display October 21 - December 30 at the Society of Illustrators

The Society of Illustrators is proud to present “The Art of Leo and Diane Dillon,” on display October 21 – December 20, 2014 at the Museum of American Illustration at the Society of Illustrators. Featuring a selection of work by the talented duo from a career that spanned over five decades, the exhibit includes illustrations that appeared in newspapers, magazines, advertisements, on book jackets, and in children’s books.

Leo Dillon and Diane Sorber met at Parsons School of Design in New York City in 1954. Right away, they were drawn to each other’s artistic abilities, at first as rivals. But over the years, their competitive friendship led to a personal and working relationship. They were married shortly after graduating and quickly developed a unique method of creating art together. As they once reported, “In terms of our work, it is virtually impossible to consider us separately. On every project we undertake, we hash out ideas together.”

During their long career, the Dillons created thousands of images, changing the approach they took and the media and techniques they used to suit each project. They might choose ink and watercolor for one piece, pastel and tempera for another, and alkyds on wood panel for yet another. They also incorporated diverse characters and cultures into their work, reaching a wide audience and inspiring generations to come.

The Dillons are the recipients of multiple awards, including two Caldecott Medals, five New York Times Best Illustrated Awards, four Boston Globe/Horn Book Awards, two Coretta Scott King Awards, and three Coretta Scott King Honors. They were inducted into the Society of Illustrators’ Hall of Fame in 1997, and their work has been shown in the Brooklyn Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, among others.

The Society’s exhibit features selections from several of the Dillons’ award-winning children’s books, including the 1977 Caldecott Medal winner Ashanti to Zulu: African Traditions, written by Margaret Musgrove and published by Dial Press; the 2005 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales,written by Virginia Hamilton and published by Knopf Books for Young Readers; and the 1997 Chelsea Award winner for Best Science Fiction Hardcover Jacket Sabriel: The Abhorsen Trilogy, written by Garth Nix and published by HarperCollins.

Leo and Diane Dillon’s son, Lee, who is a painter, sculptor, and jewelry craftsman, also contributed to some of the Dillons’ illustrations on display. Leo Dillon passed away in 2012. This exhibit is dedicated to his memory and great talent.

The Society of Illustrators is located at 128 East 63 Street in New York City. 

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Ashanti to Zulu: African Traditions
(Cover)
Written by Margaret Musgrove
Dial Books, 1976
Watercolor and pastel on Bristol board
Collection of Diane Dillon
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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Magician’s Nephew
(Cover)
By C. S. Lewis
1984
HarperCollins / Harper Trophy
Acrylic on acetate with bronze frame by Lee Dillon (son)
Collection of Diane Dillon
Image 3
To Sleep with Ghosts: A Novel of Africa
By G. F. Michelsen
1991
Collection of Diane Dillon
Image 4
Knight and Dragon
1986
Scott Foresman
Pastel and Watercolor on Bristol board
Collection of Diane Dillon

A Look into the Society’s Collection: William Arthur Smith’s “Manhattan Manhunt”

William Arthur Smith’s (1918 - 1989) “Manhattan Manhunt” (dissolved lithographic tusche on gesso board) was created for a short story by Matt Taylor.  The caption reads “Through the canyons of Manhattan he was tracked to his death, but it was his own vicious soul that finally betrayed him.” This piece was done for Heart’s Cosmopolitan in March, 1945.  Below is how it appeared in print:

William Arthur Smith was born in Toledo, Ohio.  He had quite the education, studying at the University of Toledo, the Grand Central Art School, the Art Students League, l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts and l’Academie de la Grand Chaumiere in Paris, and studied under Theodore J. Keane.

He won many awards during his career including the Winslow Homer Memorial Prize and a gold medal from the Society of Illustrators in the Advertising Category.

He was elected to the Society’s Hall of Fame in 1981.

A look into the Society’s Permanent Collection!

The Society of Illustrators Past President and Co-Chair of the Permanent Collection, Library and Archives, Richard Berenson, is giving us a look at pieces from the Society’s collection.  For those of you who don’t follow Today’s Inspiration, a Facebook group dedicated to sharing classic illustration, design, cartoon and comic art pre-1975, we will be sharing some of our posts here! First up: Pruett A. Carter’s “Hail and Farewell”.

This piece was created for a story by Williston Rich and appeared in The American Magazine in December, 1938.  It is oil and canvas, and was donated to the Society by the artist himself.

Carter (1891-1955) began his career as an art editor for Good Housekeeping magazine, but eventually dove into illustration after assigning himself a story manuscript.  After moving to California in 1930, Carter found steady work, specializing in the ability to “paint women sympathetically; his heroines were noted for their gentle, patrician beauty” (The Illustrator in America by Walt Reed).  Carter taught many talented illustrators while heading the department at Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles, including recent Society Hall of Fame inductee Mary Blair.

The piece “Hail and Farewell” recently returned to the Society after being loaned to the Disney Family Museum for their Mary Blair exhibit. They included the below photo of Carter painting the scene alongside the art.

Educators Symposium Highlight: Paul Levitz

photo credit: Seth Kushner 

Paul Levitz is a comic fan (The Comic Reader), editor (Batman), writer (Legion of Super-Heroes, executive (30 years at DC, ending as President & Publisher), historian (75 Years of DC Comics: The Art Of Modern Myth-Making (Taschen, 2010)) and educator (including the American Graphic Novel at Columbia).  He won two consecutive annual Comic Art Fan Awards for Best Fanzine, received Comic-con International’s Inkpot Award, the prestigious Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award, the Comicsn Industry Appreciation Award from ComicsPro and the Dick Giordano Humanitarian Award from the Hero Initiative.  His Taschen book won the Eisner Award, the Eagle Award and Munich’s Peng Pris, and is being released in revised form as five volumes in 2013-5.  He is co-author of the second edition of The Power of Comics (with Randy Duncan and Matthew Smith), the first college level textbook on comics.  He is currently working on a book on Will Eisner and the birth of the graphic novel for Abrams Comic Arts.  Levitz also serves on the board of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, Proof:Media for Social Justice, and Boom! Studios.

Paul will be speaking on Saturday, October 11, at 9:30 AM in the Main Gallery at the Educators Symposium.  His talk “Making Comics and Graphic Novels an Effective Educational Track” will focus on how to teach comics and graphic novels in colleges and secondary schools as part of an integrated approach.

Educators Symposium: Vincent Di Fate

Vincent Di Fate has been an illustrator working in the specialties of science fiction, fantasy and aerospace art for nearly 50 years.  He is a full professor at FIT, a former president of the Society of Illustrators, a past chair of the Society’s Permanent Collection Committee, a Hugo Award winner for Best Professional Art, an inductee of the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and a recipient of the Distinguished Educator in the Arts Award. Di Fate also authored four books on illustration and  has written approximately 300 articles on various art, science and film-related topics for magazines, books, encyclopedias and museum publications.

Vincent Di Fate will be joined by Alice Carter and Alan Male in the presentation “Why Publishing Matters” at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, Oct. 11, at 3:00 PM.

The presentation will focus on the changes in the publishing and moving image media that necessitate altering our definition and understanding of the many uses to which illustration is now being applied.  Creating pictures for publication distinguishes illustration from other forms of art, and students usually enter the field with this goal in mind.  However, many illustration programs were conceived when publishing meant print. Today, electronic outlets afford new opportunities but also require new abilities.  The challenge for educators is how to deliver added content without compromising the teaching of essential skills.

Educators Symposium Highlight: Alice Carter

Alice Carter’s illustration clients have included Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Lucasfilm, and ABC TV. Her work has been exhibited at venues including the Society of Illustrators,The Norman Rockwell Museum, the New Britain Museum, and the Delaware Art Museum. Teaching awards include the Outstanding Professor Award from SJSU, the Society of Illustrators Distinguished Educator In the Arts award, and a Fulbright Fellowship in Cairo, Egypt. Carter is President of the Board of Trustees at the Norman Rockwell Museum and serves on the Advisory Board of Spectrum. Carter’s publications include, The Art of National Geographic: One Hundred Years of IllustrationThe Red Rose Girls: An Uncommon Story of Art and LoveThe EssentialThomas Eakins, andCecilia Beaux: A Modern Painter in The Gilded Age

Alice Carter will be joined by Vincent Di Fate and Alan Male in the presentation “Why Publishing Matters” at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, Oct. 11, at 3:00 PM.

The presentation will focus on the changes in the publishing and moving image media that necessitate altering our definition and understanding of the many uses to which illustration is now being applied.  Creating pictures for publication distinguishes illustration from other forms of art, and students usually enter the field with this goal in mind.  However, many illustration programs were conceived when publishing meant print. Today, electronic outlets afford new opportunities but also require new abilities.  The challenge for educators is how to deliver added content without compromising the teaching of essential skills.  

Educators Symposium Highlight: Courtney Granner

                                         

Courtney Granner received his BFA from Western Kentucky University and subsequently studied for two years at The Art Institute of Boston before earning his MA from Syracuse University. After working for a subsidiary of Hallmark Cards in Boston, he relocated to California in 1983 to work for Atari Computer. His list of illustration clients includes the New York Times, The Washington Post, Business Week, Chronicle of Higher Education, United Airlines, American Airlines, IBM, Kiplinger’s, Reader’s Digest, and the New Yorker. His commissions garnered recognition from the CA Art Annual, the Print Design Annual, the N.Y. SOI, 
the L,A. SOI, S.F. SOI and has been represented in shows around the country including at the Museum of American Illustration in New York, The Norman Rockwell Museum, and the Delaware 
Museum. Courtney is a Professor in San Jose State University’s Animation/Illustration program, having taught for twenty-eight years. His academic honors include a Teaching Innovation Award, a Teacher Scholar Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship.

Courtney will be joined with Clemente Botelho and Kam Mak in the presentation "The Benefits of Teaching Abroad" during the Educators Symposium on Friday, October 10 at 2:30pm.

Successful study abroad programs offer an appealing mix of travel, exploration and discovery in an academic framework rewarding for both students and faculty alike. When the demand for illustration graduates include an ever-broader awareness of the global visual culture, they must navigate the sometime contradictory notion to potently access a personal visual vocabulary while being immersed in creative environments that are more overtly collaborative in nature. This panel will explore how curriculum driven Study Abroad models may be a valuable pathway for the conceptual, material, and personal evolution of tomorrow’s illustrators.  

Educators Symposium Highlight: Alan Male

Professor Alan Male is an illustrator, writer and academic. He is currently Director of Study for Illustration at Falmouth University (England) and led the BA programme from 1993 to 2010 to gain an international reputation for excellence. An authority on communication and cultural studies, professional practice, science and knowledge bearing imagery, he contributes widely to debates across a range of journals, conferences, magazines and learned papers. Professor Male is author of Illustration: A Theoretical and Contextual Perspective, a recommended textbook published worldwide it has received excellent reviews. His second book, Illustration: Meeting the Brief was published February 2014. He has illustrated more than 170 books and won numerous awards including Gold from the Society of a Illustrators Los Angeles and a Texas Bluebonnet for children’s books. He has exhibited internationally and has work in New York States museum’s permanent collection where he has won the critically acclaimed ‘Focus on Nature’ Jury Award three times.

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Alan Male will moderate a panel with Vincent Di Fate and Alice Carter  for the presentation Why Publishing Matters at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 at 3:00 PM. They will focus on the value of publishing, particularly the importance of writing books on illustration, and will discuss the reasons for publishing, how to do it, and for what audience.  

Educators Symposium Highlight: Marguerite Dabaie

Portrait by Graham Haber

Born in San Francisco, Marguerite Dabaie moved to NYC in order to attend SVA. While there, she was awarded two grants for her comic, The Hookah Girl and Other True Stories, an autobiography about Palestinian-Americans. The cultural differences she has felt between Arab and American cultures heavily informs her work. She is currently working on a new comic, A Voyage to Panjikant, a work of historical-fiction about Central Asians during the height of the Silk Road. As a copy editor at the Morgan Library & Museum, she has been able to pursue her love for art history and meticulous researching, which has also helped her with her current comic. Her MFA thesis that she wrote while at the Fashion Institute of Technology,Women in Middle-Eastern Comics, exemplifies her academic side. She strives to combine comic art with academia. She was awarded the Master of Fine Arts Medal during her time at FIT. Marguerite has contributed to multiple comics anthologies throughout the years and also voluntarily created an informational comic to be passed out to diabetes patients. Once a year, Marguerite co-hosts Pete’s Mini Zine Fest, the fest-in-a-bar, in Brooklyn. She regularly teaches art to clients at Visiting Nurse Services as a form of therapy. She has also taught comic workshops for children and adults at various schools and libraries in the tri-state area. 

Marguerite will be joined by Marcos Chin and Sara Wooley for the presentation Technology and Craft at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 at 4:15 PM.

Learn how these artists took the initiative to create new aspects of their careers and discovered a passion for pattern-making, fashion design, toy and jewelry design, home accessories, comics and zines, and more! 

Educators Symposium Highlight: Sara Woolley

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Sara Woolley is an award-winning artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work has been recognized by the NY Society of Illustrators, the Society of Illustrators Los Angeles, and most recently by 3×3 Magazine of Contemporary Illustration.  She has worked on a variety of exciting projects for publishers and institutions including Scholastic, Random House, Crumpetime Comics UK, and Round Robin Editrice IT.  She also creates innovative concept art, costume pieces and props for film and theatrical performance.  Credits include the feature film Monkey Bone. Sara’s ongoing personal project, a fictionalized graphic memoir written collaboratively with her mother Leila Gómez Woolley, Los Pirineos the mostly true memoirs of Esperancita Gómez, was singled out for award by the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture. Los Pirineos chronicles a young girl’s upbringing in and eventual exile from Colombia told through the lens of childhood imagination.  Researched on location in Colombia, it is at once deeply personal while giving voice to a common immigrant experience.

Sara will be joined by Margo Dabaie and Sara Wooley for the presentationTechnology and Craft at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 at 4:15 PM.

Learn how these artists took the initiative to create new aspects of their careers and discovered a passion for pattern-making, fashion design, toy and jewelry design, home accessories, comics and zines, and more! 

Educators Symposium Highlight: Marcos Chin

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Marcos Chin is an award winning Illustrator whose work has appeared as surface and wall designs, on book and CD covers, advertisements, fashion catalogues, and magazines. He has worked with such companies as Neiman Marcus, Fiat, Budweiser, Time, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, GQ, Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, Penguin Books, and most recently created the illustrations for Target’s debut advertising campaign across Canada. In addition to his illustrations, Marcos has also created a custom design T shirt label called YEE YEE. The Tees are printed, cut & sewn in his studio in Brooklyn. Marcos has given lectures and workshops throughout the US and abroad, and currently lives in New York where he teaches Illustration at the School of Visual Arts.

Marcos will be joined by Margo Dabaie and Sara Wooley for the presentation Technology and Craft at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 at 4:15 PM.

Learn how these artists took the initiative to create new aspects of their careers and discovered a passion for pattern-making, fashion design, toy and jewelry design, home accessories, comics and zines, and more! 

Educators Symposium Highlight: Melanie Reim

Melanie Reim travels with a sketchbook never far from her side. Melanie lives in NYC where she is an Associate Professor, the former Assistant Dean in the School of Art and Design, and presently, the chairperson of the MFA in Illustration in the School of Graduate Studies at FIT. As a globally recognized reportage artist, and long-time illustrator, she has traveled to the Dominican Republic, South Africa, Europe and China to document happenings from sugar cane workers to seamstresses in factories. She regularly teaches and lectures abroad, and her visual journals and teaching methodologies have been the subject of international articles and featured in drawing books. Her work is part of the US Air Force Art Collection, Washington, DC, as well as other group and solo shows. Melanie is a 2006 Fulbright Scholar, has served with ICON: The Illustration Conference as Board Member and Volunteer Coordinator for three consecutive conferences and now serves as Education Chair on the Board of Directors at The Society of Illustrators, where she advocates for the love of drawing and design, and the rich and well-rounded education of illustration students everywhere, as they are the future of the industry.

Melanie Reim serves as the Education Chair on the Board of Directors of the Society of Illustrators.  She will be kicking off the Educators Symposium  with Society Executive Director Anelle Miller and Educators Symposium Chair Chuck Pyle on Friday, October 10 at 5:00 PM.  She will also be speaking on Sunday, October 11 at 10:30 AM during an Education Committee Update.

Educators Symposium Highlight: Adam McCauley

Adam McCauley works out of his studio in his home in the sunny Mission district in San Francisco with his wife, designer and musician Cynthia Wigginton and their cat Gertrude. He’s a professor in the amazing Illustration department at California College of the Arts. Adam enjoys illustrating, playing drums, and making things. His illustrations have appeared in magazines, books, collateral and campaigns world wide. Clients have included Time, MTV, Apple Computer, the New York Times, Itaú Bank, Smithsonian, Levi’s, Viking, Harper Collins, The Folio Society, Chronicle Books, SF Museum of Modern Art, Victoria & Albert Museum, Microsoft, and many others.  Awards have included American Illustration, Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts, Print Regional Design Annual, 3 x 3, and How Magazine.  Adam received the Society of Illustrator’s 51 Gold Medal for his illustrated monster stamp endpapers for the book “The Monsterologist: A Memoir In Rhyme” by Bobbi Katz, as well as the Society of Illustrator’s 55 Silver Medal for “Simplicity City”, commissioned by WeTransfer.com. ”Oh No, Not Ghosts!,” by Richard Michelson, was chosen to be included in AIGA’s Top 100 show for 2007, “The Monsterologist” in AIGA’s Top 100 Show for 2009.

Adam McCauley will be joined by Robert Hunt for the presentation  Professional Practices at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 beginning at 11:00 PM.  

In it, he will discuss the importance of instilling good professional practices on students before they leave the department, focusing on a curriculum that combines a sense of long term thinking in financial and creative endeavors and shows students the ways creative freedom and financial stability are intertwined. 

To learn more about the Educators Symposium visit our website. 

Educators Symposium Highlight: Robert Hunt

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As described by Walt Reed in the most recent edition of The Illustrator in America, “His work reflects his classical training, but with a contemporary take.”Robert Hunt has created illustrations for a wide variety of projects including editorial illustrations for many major publications, hundreds of book covers, and numerous special projects including the Dreamworkslogo and motion logos, advertisements, annual reports, packaging, as well as documentary projects including the Bay Bridge Earthquake reconstruction and on- location illustrated coverage of the Tour de France. His work has received numerous awards and has appeared regularly in the New York Society of Illustrator’s Annual as well as American Illustration, Spectrum and the Communication Arts, Graphis and Print Design and Illustration Annuals. Hunt is also an Associate Professor at the California College of the Arts (Formerly CCAC.). 

Robert Hunt will be joined by Adam McCauley for the presentation  Professional Practices at the Educators Symposium on Saturday, October 11 beginning at 11:00 PM.  

In it, he will discuss the importance of instilling good professional practices on students before they leave the department, focusing on a curriculum that combines a sense of long term thinking in financial and creative endeavors and shows students the ways creative freedom and financial stability are intertwined. 

To learn more about the Educators Symposium visit our website.